Tag Archives: diabetes

Daily Olive Oil Supplementation Improves Coronary Artery Disease Risk

Olive oil has been implicated over and over again in prevention of

Photo by Flickr user USDA (http://www.flickr.com/photos/usdagov/6896388410)
Photo by Flickr user USDA (http://www.flickr.com/photos/usdagov/6896388410)

cardiovascular disease in many populations. Research has found that the oleic acid and other phenolics in the olive oil contributes to lowered cardiovascular disease risk, specifically interacting with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and other urinary proteomic biomarkers.

A new study in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition aimed to evaluate whether or not supplementing a person’s diet with olive oil had any effect on various urinary proteomic biomarkers for coronary artery disease, chronic kidney disease, and diabetes. Additionally, two olive oil treatments were compared: one with low levels of phenolics or one with high levels of phenolics.

69 healthy people participated in this study and were randomly assigned supplementation with either high phenolic olive oil, or low phenolic olive oil. Supplementation occurred daily over a period of 6 weeks. Daily doses were 20mL.

Low phenolic olive oil was categorized as containing 18mg caffeic acid equivalents per kg, while high phenolic olive oil was categorized as containing 286mg caffeic acid equivalents per kg.

Urinary proteomic biomarkers, blood lipids, antioxidant capacity, and glycation markers were measured were measured at baseline, 3 weeks, and 6 weeks after daily olive oil supplementation.

Important Findings

  • Daily supplementation of both olive oils reduced biomarker levels for coronary artery disease.
  • Daily supplementation of both olive oils had no influence on biomarker levels of chronic kidney disease or diabetes.
  • There were no significant differences in reduction of disease biomarkers between olive oil with low levels of phenolics versus olive oil with high levels of phenolics.

The results of this study indicate that supplementation with olive oil improved coronary artery disease risk based on urinary proteomic

Photo by Flickr user Smabs Sputzer (http://www.flickr.com/photos/10413717@N08/6825479819)
Photo by Flickr user Smabs Sputzer (http://www.flickr.com/photos/10413717@N08/6825479819)

biomarkers in healthy adults. On the other hand, olive oil supplementation did not seem to influence chronic kidney disease or diabetes risk based on urinary proteomic biomarkers.

Finally, there were no significant differences between the high and low phenolic doses of olive oil supplements, indicating that low dose of 18mg caffeic acid/kg is just as good as a high dose of 286mg caffeic acid per kg in reducing coronary artery disease risk.

Source:

Silva, S., Bronze, M.R., Figueira, M.E., Siwy, J., Mischak, H., Combet, E., and Mullen, W. 2015. Impact of a 6-wk olive oil supplementation in healthy adults on urinary proteomic biomarkers of coronary artery disease, chronic kidney disease, and diabetes (types 1 and 2): a randomized, parallel, controlled, double-blind study. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition: ajcn.114.094219v1101/1/44.

Mediterranean Diet May Significantly Reduce Fatty Liver Disease Risk

Fatty liver disease is a metabolic condition that has been liked to type 2 diabetes as well as cardiovascular diseases. Specifically, fatty

Photo courtesy pixabay.com
Photo courtesy pixabay.com

liver disease is a known risk factor for these diseases, making care and prevention of the disease of utmost important in a world where type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease are all too prevalent in society.

A healthy diet, like a Mediterranean-style diet, has been often cited as a way to reduce the risk of fatty liver disease and associated diseases such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

A new study published in the journal Current Opinion in Lipidology reviewed published research on the effects of diet on the risk of fatty liver disease from March 2013 through August 2014. A total of 5 peer-reviewed studies were published during this time period and used for analysis.

Important Findings:

Continue reading Mediterranean Diet May Significantly Reduce Fatty Liver Disease Risk

Effect of Diet on Type 2 Diabetes Risk Varies Between Ethnicities

There has been a lot of research on the effect of diet on risk of Type 2 diabetes in adults, a topic not unknown to us at The French Paradox (click here for some research we’ve covered). However, to

Photo by Flickr user candyfields29 (https://www.flickr.com/photos/25517428@N05/)
Photo by Flickr user candyfields29 (https://www.flickr.com/photos/25517428@N05/)

date, there has been very little examining possible ethnic differences in terms of adherence to the Mediterranean diet (or similar diets) and risk of Type 2 diabetes development.

As a result of this lack of information, a recent research study aimed to compare different ethnicities in terms of their risk of developing Type 2 diabetes after consuming various diets (including the Mediterranean diet).

Dietary adherence and Type 2 diabetes prevalence was measured for white, Japanese-American, and Native Hawaiian adults.

A total of 89,185 adults were recruited for this study, with 11,217 of them reported to have Type 2 diabetes.

Dietary patterns were assessed via several self-reported questionnaires.

Important Findings:

Continue reading Effect of Diet on Type 2 Diabetes Risk Varies Between Ethnicities

Eating a Healthy Diet Reduces Risk of Systemic Inflammation in Older Adults

Systemic inflammation is known to be associated with several health problems and diseases, including various types of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and cancers. It is also known that a poor diet is also linked to these same diseases and more, raising the question of

Photo By Dimitrije Krstic (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
Photo By Dimitrije Krstic (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
whether diet choice is associated with systemic inflammation, or if these markers for certain diseases are mutually exclusive.

A new research study from Lund University in Sweden focused on a group of 667 older adults between the ages of 63 and 68, to determine if diet quality was associated with the clinical signs of systemic inflammation.

At baseline, the participants answered questions related to socio-demographics. Additionally, height, weight, BMI, hip and waist circumferences, blood pressure, various blood sample measurements, and diet quality indices were collected and analyzed.

Important Findings:

Continue reading Eating a Healthy Diet Reduces Risk of Systemic Inflammation in Older Adults

Wine, Mediterranean Diet, and Your Health News for 01/07/2015

Please click on the links below to read the full articles.

Alcohol

Photo By Georg Emanuel Opitz (1775–1841) (Beurret & Bailly) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
Photo By Georg Emanuel Opitz (1775–1841) (Beurret & Bailly) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Olives and Olive Oil

Mediterranean Diet

Continue reading Wine, Mediterranean Diet, and Your Health News for 01/07/2015